viernes, 20 de noviembre de 2009

ON THIS DAY IN ELVIS HISTORY November 12

November 12, 1955
At 2.00 p.m. Elvis and other Hayride artists appeared at the opening of a new mill at Carthage Milling Company, Texas.
Later that day Elvis performed at the Louisiana Hayride, Municipal Auditorium, Shreveport and was called the most promising C & W Artist by Billboard's Annual Disc Jockey Poll.
November 12, 1956
Elvis rented a Cadillac from Hertz for $139.
November 12, 1970
Elvis performed at the Coliseum, Seattle, Washington.
CONCERT DETAILS:
Tour Ref: On Tour number 3 - November 10th - November 17th 1970
Date: November 12 1970
Venue: Coliseum
Location: Seattle WA
Showtime: (8:30 pm)
Crowd: 15000
REVIEWS:
Article *:
VIDEO INFORMATION:
Release: The Crown Elvis Presley Series 1970
Length: 19 mins
ELVIS ATTIRE:
Suit: Fringe suit
Belt: Green Macrame belt
Cape:
GROUP ATTIRE:

Musicians:Black Suit
TICKET STUBS:
SONGS - TRACKLISTINGS:
Opening Theme
Thats All Right
I Got A Woman
- segued medley with -
Amen
Love Me Tender
You Dont Have To Say You Love Me
Sweet Caroline
Youve Lost That Loving Feeling
Polk Salad Annie
Band Introductions
Johnny B Goode
( featuring James Burton )
How Great Thou Art
( above song includes 1 false start )
How Great Thou Art
( followed by a reprise of above song )
The Wonder Of You
Heartbreak Hotel
Blue Suede Shoes
Hound Dog
Funny How Time Slips Away
Cant Help Falling In Love
Closing Vamp
CDS FROM CONCERT:

Import CD

CDRS FROM CONCERT:


PICTURES FROM CONCERT:

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Newspaper Articles



CONCERT DATE: November 12, 1970
Presley's show no blockbuster
by Janine Gressel
Seattle Daily News
November 13, 1970

All of the conditions were right for Elvis Presley's concert at The Coliseum last night to have been a smash hit. The concert was sold out and the audience was "up" for it to the point of frenzy.

But despite Elvis' personal magnetism and incredible popularity, the show was disappointing. his performance was short - perhaps 40 minutes, but it seemed much less. He sang only 14 songs and of those, only six were original Elvis hits.

Much of the time was spent with the star horsing around on stage - jokingly putting down Tom Jones, Engelsbert Humperdink and Glen Campbell (for no apparent reason) continually striking ridiculously "dramatic" poses (which elicited wild screams from the mesmerized fans), plucking the hat from a policeman standing by the stage and strutting back and forth with the hat on his head.

These actions were mildly amusing, but definitely not worth the price of a ticket

THE TONE OF the concert was strange, as Elvis clearly had the talent and ability to have been putting on a top-notch show. But instead of satisfying the audience with his music, he replied on blatant gimmickry to garner applause

His repertoire of original hits was pitifully small considering the number of successes he has had over the past 15 years. He sang "Love Me Tender" much better than when he first recorded it) "How Great Thou Art," "Heartbreak Hotel," "blue Suede Shoes," Hound Dog" and "Can't Help Falling In Love With You"

Two others, "You Don't Have To Say You Love Me" and "The Wonder Of You" were recent Elvis hits, but were originally made popular by other singers - Cher Bono and Ray Peterson, respectively.

The others, such as "Sweet Caroline," "Polk Salad Annie" and :Johnny B. Goode," all were made famous by other performers are not charts hits for Elvis.

There is of course nothing wrong with doing other artists' material - and Elvis did well on his arrangements. but for a performer with such an enormous list of credits to his own name to offer so few of them to his audience is, in a sense, cheating.

His fans undoubtedly came to hear Elvis sing Elvis songs. In that respect they were shortchanged.

THE AUDIENCE was in such an emotional state from the time Elvis took the stage that all he had to do was look at a section of the crowd and the fans seated there went wild. Despite the shortcomings of the concert, he undoubtedly would have received a standing ovation - just because he was there. but the audience was cheated of that gesture, too. At the close of I Can't Help Falling In Love With You" without warning, elvis suddenly bolted from the stage. The house lights went on and anonymous voice announced "Elvis has left the building."

As if a state of shock, the crowd was silent. Everyone looked around as if to say, "Where did he go?" With a mass shrug of the shoulders, the audience quietly filed from the hall. What we had seen of Elvis Presley was pretty good, but it was far from satisfying.


Courtesy of Francesc LopezCONCERT DATE: November 12, 1970


Elvis Still Has It
by Stephanie Miller
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
November 13, 1970

The houselights darkened. The flashbulbs started popping. Squeals started to swell, and on swaggered Elvis Presley to the Coliseum stage last night wearing slinky white bell-bottoms and white buck shoes, western fringe hanging down his laced up shirt and a Kelly green sash dangling from the swinging hips that made him famous.

He put on a mere 40 minutes show for the more 15,000 fans, but it was a heckuva show. He kept the swoons to a minimum, letting the songs to roll off one after the other, and held the crowd in his everlovin grasp throughout.

He still has the sultry, down in the throat quality that made "Love Me Tender, Love Me Do, his heart-breaking trademark.

Stalking from one end of the stage to the other, he conducted the band, the lead guitar and the octet of vocalists that introduced the show through 15 years of songs.

"You Don't Have To Say You Love Me," "Please Caroline," "Go Johnny Go," and "Ain't It Funny" - he rolled them off with the ease of a pro. And he never lost contact with the audience. "You've all seen me, now I want to look at you," he drawled as he asked that the houselights be turned up a moment.

If the teens started to squeal, he cracked a joke mid-medley about how Glen Campbell would sing the song, or pointed to some fellow walking down the aisle.

He kept it real, in spite of his magnetic presence.

He didn't take himself seriously, and that's just what the crowd, which took in teens to totterers liked about him. Introducing himself as Johnny Cash, he launched into an imitation of the bumps and grinds Tom jones enjoys.

He's got humor

And he still has the Elvis charisma. He threw his head around during "Heartbreak Hotel" until his coalblack hair covered his forehead.

And he threw his green neck scarf to a blonde in the front row.

But it didn't get out of hand. He came to sing, and sing he did. He gave a new flavor to the greats from the 50's - "You Ain't Nothing But a Hounddog," "Blue Suede Shoes," - and sang with appealing richness the gospel tune which won him a Grammy in '56 - "How Great Thou Art."

That was his serious tune, and when he was dissatisfied with the entrance by his back-up singers - "The Sweet Inspirations" black female quartet and "The Imperials," male quartet - he started the song again.

He's a musician, too, in spite of the gimmicks of letting his voice trail off into nowhere and garbling the words for the sake of swagger. His voice has matured measurably since the days when he pulled microphones nearly out from the cords. It's still sexy but it's also mellow and trained.

And that's nice to know, that he's relying on his voice for drawing power. his comeback is attracting all ages, from 15 year-olds who have never heard "Heartbreak hotel" to 30 year-olds who have.

The advance entertainers - the singers and the comedian, Sammy shore, who are accompanying him on both his six-city tour and his stint in Las Vegas - did much to heighten the atmosphere.

When the squealers in the crowd scrambled to the stage as soon as Elvis sang his last note, the PA system announced he had left the building.

That green scarf he threw them was a teaser.


 
November 12, 1971
Elvis performed at the Hofheinz Pavilion, Houston, Texas.
CONCERT DETAILS:
Tour Ref: On Tour number 4 - November 5th - November 16th 1971
Date: November 12 1971
Venue: Hofheinz Pavillon
Location: Houston TX
Showtime: (8:30 pm)
Crowd: 12000
REVIEWS:
Article *:
VIDEO INFORMATION:
Release: Behind The Image Vol.2
Length: 17 mins 57 secs
Quality:
ELVIS ATTIRE:
Suit: White Matador suit
Belt: Lion Head belt
Cape: Red cape
GROUP ATTIRE:

Musicians:White Suit
TICKET STUBS:
SONGS - TRACKLISTINGS:
2001 Theme
Thats All Right
I Got A Woman
- segued medley with -
Amen
Proud Mary
You Dont Have To Say You Love Me
Youve Lost That Loving Feeling
Polk Salad Annie
Young And Beautiful
( above song is just an excerpt )
Love Me
Heartbreak Hotel
Blue Suede Shoes
One Night
Its Now Or Never
Are You Lonesome Tonight ?
( above song includes 1 false start )
Hound Dog
How Great Thou Art
Band Introductions
Lawdy Miss Clawdy
I Cant Stop Loving You
Love Me Tender
Hawaiian Wedding Song
( above song includes 1 false start )
Bridge Over Troubled Water
( followed by a reprise of above song )
Release Me
The Impossible Dream
Suspicious Minds
Funny How Time Slips Away
Mystery Train
- segued medley with -
Tiger Man
Cant Help Falling In Love
Closing Vamp
CDRS FROM CONCERT:

PICTURES FROM CONCERT:

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Newspaper Articles



CONCERT DATE: November 12 1971 (8:30 pm). Houston TX.
Presley Remains A Magic Figure
By Janis Parks
Houston Post
November 13, 1971

Elvis Presley is still a magic figure, even after all these years.

A motley mob assembled at Hofheinz Pavillion Friday night to see the legend.

The show started off with the Sweet Inspirations. This trio sang hits like "I want to Take You Higher," Put It In The Want Ads," and of course, "Sweet Inspiration."

A comedian, jackie DeHain, then performed. He touched on topical subjects such as the upcoming elections, liquor by the drink and Muhammad Ali's fight.

After a brief intermission, Elvis, plus five musicians, plus a group of backup vocalists and an orchestra, came on stage. Elvis was introduced to them from "2001."

As he stepped to the front of the stage, flashbulbs went off from every direction.

Presley still has a lean and hungry look, despite his sequined pants and bright red cape.

He picked up a guitar, momentarily during his second song but the instrument wasn't hooked up. Fortunately, Elvis Presley need not rely on anything like a musical instrument for entertainment.

His famous gyrations are quite a show.

Presley sang everything from "Hound Dog," "Heartbreak Hotel," "Blue Suede Shoes," to "How Great Thou Art" and "Bridge Over Troubled Waters."

He was an absolute sensation and a fascinating performer. I'm still not sure what he does, but it's never boring.


Courtesy of Sebastiano Cecer

 

November 12, 1972
Elvis performed at the Swing Auditorium, San Bernardino, California at 5.00 p.m.
 
CONCERT DETAILS:
Tour Ref: On Tour number 7 - November 8th - November 18th 1972
Date: November 12 1972
Venue: Swing Auditorium
Location: San Bernardino CA
Showtime: (5:00 pm)
Crowd: 7200
REVIEWS:
Article *:
ELVIS ATTIRE:
Suit: Black Conquistador suit
Belt: Original belt
Cape: Blue cape
GROUP ATTIRE:

Kathy Westmoreland: White Suit
The Sweet Inspirations: White Suit
Musicians:White Suit
TICKET STUBS:
SONGS - TRACKLISTINGS:
2001 Theme
See See Rider
I Got A Woman
Until Its Time For You To Go
You Dont Have To Say You Love Me
Polk Salad Annie
Love Me
All Shook Up
Heartbreak Hotel
Blue Suede Shoes
One Night
Teddy Bear
- segued medley with -
Dont Be Cruel
Hound Dog
Ill Remember You
How Great Thou Art
( followed by a reprise of above song )
Suspicious Minds
Band Introductions
What Now My Love
Burning Love
Fever
You Gave Me A Mountain
A Big Hunk Of Love
Love Me Tender
Cant Help Falling In Love
Closing Vamp
CDRS FROM CONCERT:

PICTURES FROM CONCERT:

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Newspaper Articles



CONCERT DATE: November 12, 1972 (5:00 pm). San Bernardino, CA.
It's Just Elvis Presley Next Door
by Robert Hilburn
Los Angeles Times
November 14, 1972

After being unable to see Elvis Presley anywhere in concert for more than 10 years, the idea of seeing the biggest single recording / concert attraction of our time at 5pm. on a Sunday afternoon in San Bernardino - of all 11 places - was too incredulous an event to miss.

Can you imagine, for instance, Brian Epstein bringing the Beatles to Fresno at the height of their career? It is, I suppose, part of Col. Tom Parker's unpredictable genius that allows for such surprises. Maybe Parker just wanted some of his Palm Springs friends a chance to see Elvis close to home. More likely, it is part of a well-designed plan to keep Presley in front of the public without retracting his steps.

Though Presley has been touring extensively for two years, he rarely plays the same hall more than once. He may go back to the same area, but it is usually to a different arena. In 1970, for instance, Presley appeared at the Inglewood Forum, while this time he is playing the Swing Auditorium (Sunday and Monday) and the Long Beach Arena (tonight and Wednesday night). All shows are sold out.

New Each Time

Thus, each stop on a Presley tour carries that special bit of excitement and enthusiasm that comes from playing a new hall. There is a feeling of something special about each concert, a feeling that reflects itself in both the hall employes and the audience. And that tinge of excitement was in the air Sunday.

Though the Swing Auditorium has a long history of rock concerts (from Joe Cocker to Rod Stewart), the building, because of its fairgrounds setting and exhibition hall design, has a definite county fair atmosphere to it, an atmosphere that was reinforced Sunday by the family nature of the audience. Unlike the average rock concert, the smoke in the air Sunday was from regular cigarets.

Rather than the class of 1967 that you might find in predominance at a Rolling Stones concert, the crowd Sunday probably centered around the class of 1957. There was, from the clean, pressed clothing to the carefully combed hair, a middle America feel about the audience, the kind of country music audience that may well have first greeted Elvis some 18 years ago (gulp) at Memphis' Overton Park.

The Sincerest of Tones

It was an eager, excited audience (most of the dozen or so people I asked said they were seeing Presley for the first time) that listened politely as Al Dvorin, an amble associate of Parker, went through a long pre-show announcement that included, in the sincerest of tones, some lines that, despite all the "great, appreciative audiences" that have seen Presley, he understands, honestly now, the San Bernardino audiences are the best anywhere.

The respectful applause that followed was not so much an indication the audience believed the flattery, but that anyone who were an "Elvis Show Member" badge on his lapel was all right with them. Before the applause died down, Dvorin began a rapid-fire sales pitch that squeezed into 60 seconds plugs for (1) the new "Elvis on Tour" film, (2) the live Madison Square Garden album, (3) the "Burning Love" single and (4) the new "Separate Ways" single. Before leaving the stage he also reminded the audience that photos and buttons were available at seven souvenir stands around the auditorium

If someone tried a similar sales pitch at the average rock concert, he'd be booted of the stage. Indeed, the Rolling Stones had a guy tell the audience about posters at one of the early stops on their recent U.S. tour. There was sucha chorus of boos, however, they discontinued the announcements.

Presley's show, from the material to the Instrumental backing, was similar in most ways to the ones he has been doing since his return to live performances in 1969. It was a mixture of Las Vegas and Memphis that drew the typical audience enthusiasm - from the shrieks to the continuous flashbulbs

Despite objections I have to some of the Presley material these days (i.e. overly dramatic arrangements of such songs as "What Now My Love" which he did Sunday, and "The Impossible DReam), his voice has the best balance of country, gospel and blues influences of anyone who has stepped to a microphone during the rock era. His manner, too, is admirably unpretentious, allowing him to re-create his early rock gyrations with just the right touch of humor.

It may have taken Presley 18 years to get to San Bernardino, but everyone seemed pleased when he finally made it. Even Parker and Dvorin. The souvenir stands did a brisk business


Courtesy of Francesc Lopez