martes, 1 de octubre de 2013

EL SALUDO DE JERRY LEE LEWIS



 

ANOTHER year God has blessed me. A heartfelt Thank You all for my birthday wishes. My Fans are The best in the World. I keep Rockin For YOU ALL. LOVE AND THANKS TO ALL. FANS. FAMILY AND FRIENDS. JERRYLEE. GOD BLESS.

domingo, 29 de septiembre de 2013

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JERRY LEE LEWIS!



 


1935-2013.- 78 years.-

domingo, 15 de septiembre de 2013

Cuando el Blues y el Country se encuentran...

Cuando el Blues y el Country se encuentran...

 
...esto es lo que pasa! Louis Armstrong, trompetista de jazz, grabó en 1930 junto a Jimmie Rodgers el tema Blue Yodel No 9. En este vídeo que pertenece a una emisión del Johnny Cash Show, vemos a Johnny Cash y a Armstrong hablando sobre la canción y luego interpretándola juntos.

http://youtu.be/v6F7pIF4zOU


_._,___

sábado, 14 de septiembre de 2013

The Honky Tonk Cycle

The Honky Tonk Cycle
The forgotten history of country music in the movies
by Leah Churner  

I'll bet you I'm gonna be a big star
might win an Oscar, you can't never tell
The movies gonna make me a big star
cause I can play the part so well
"Act Naturally," the song that catapulted Buck Owens to fame in 1963, was about a man so tortured and forlorn, he might as well be a method actor. In fact, several of Owens' country-music peers did cross over into Hollywood—Kris Kristofferson, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Lyle Lovett, Dwight Yoakam—but so far, not one has been recognized for acting talent by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. A better strategy, if one wants Oscar gold, is to portray a country music singer. Jeff Bridges, in the role of tumbledown troubadour Bad Blake in Crazy Heart, is the seventh actor to be nominated for such a role, after Ronee Blakley, Sissy Spacek, Robert Duvall, Jessica Lange, Reese Witherspoon, and Joaquin Phoenix.
In Crazy Heart, Bad Blake is an indentured servant on a two-lane blacktop—he's on tour, in other words, feeding the odometer of his Chevy Suburban clunker, following a Southwestern itinerary booked for him by his manager, who has given him a gas card and very little cash. Blake is a 56-year-old man, and when he wants a drink, which is always, he must rely on the charity of fans who have no idea how down-and-out he is. His fans are also approaching AARP membership, mostly women of the Virginia Slims variety: faded neon roses in strapless tops, who sway and smile seductively as he performs in one chintzy venue after another, with a new pickup band every night. Crazy Heart is set in the present, but with its backdrop of Sun Belt motor inns and lacquered brick shopping centers, and conspicuous absence of cell phones and interstate freeways, it looks like a period film.
Unlike James Mangold's Walk The Line (2005), a biopic so antiseptic, rote, and factory-finished it could be about any musician at all, Crazy Heart is a throwback to an earlier, earthier kind of movie. It harks back not only to the Oscar-winning Tender Mercies (1983), but to the whole slew of country-music movies that erupted in Hollywood in the years between Robert Altman's Nashville (1975) and Karel Reisz'sSweet Dreams (1985). This cycle emerged after the first rock-and-roll compilation soundtracks (such as Easy Rider) but before the institution of music videos on MTV; this window of time was also country music's hippest period, hot on the heels of country-rock albums like the Flying Burrito Brothers' Gilded Palace of Sin, Lee Hazlewood's Cowboy in Sweden, and Willie Nelson's Shotgun Willie
This group of films has no name. It includes independent releases, like Daryl Duke'sPayday (1973), Eagle Pennell's The Whole Shootin' Match (1978), and James Szalapski's documentary Heartworn Highways (1981) as well as Hollywood comedies, dramas, and biopics catering to a range of audiences, with varying degrees of box-office success, among them Every Which Way But Loose (1978), Bronco Billy (1980), Urban Cowboy (1980), Coal Miner's Daughter (1980), Songwriter(1984), and Rhinestone (1984). Though all of these movies are filled with country music, not all are about musicians. The organizing motif is the country-western bar, a raucous and seedy setting, long immortalized in songs like Merle Haggard's "Swinging Doors." I'll call it the honky-tonk cycle.
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The term honky-tonk originated in the environs of East Texas and Oklahoma. The first print appearance, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was in the February 24, 1894 issue of The Daily Ardmoreite, of Ardmore, Oklahoma: "the honk-a-tonk last night was well attended by ball-heads, bachelors and leading citizens." As early as 1918, the term appeared in song titles, like the Tin Pan Alley number "Everything Is Hunky Dory Down in Honky Tonk Town," and was variously described in literature of the 1920s as "a dance resort...[full of] the rhythms of Jazz," an "underworld dance hall" and "a gaudy saloon with a backroom hangout." C.E. Mulford put it into the mouth of a reproving bartender in his 1930 novel Deputy Sheriff: "This place ain't no damn honkatonk, stranger." After the repeal of Prohibition, honky-tonk gained its country music connotations. As Nick Tosches defines it in his book Country, honky-tonk became the name for "the loud, small-group sound that developed in the redneck bars of east Texas oil boom towns: amplified guitars and lyrics of sex and whiskey."
The music was a product of Southern urbanization, of rural people (mostly white) transplanted to centers of industrial employment during the Depression and World War II. Lyrics about drinking, dancing and fast-living women became central to the canon, in songs like "Stompin' At the Honky-tonk," "I Ain't Goin' Honky-Tonkin' No More," and "Honky Tonk Mama." Webb Pierce, George Jones, and Johnny Paycheck popularized the sound after the war, maintaining its themes of sinful indulgence, guilt, and self-pity.
The honky-tonk mystique came late to the movies. Country stars and country music were not popular subjects in Hollywood for the first several decades of sound film. (Western movie music by groups like the Sons of the Pioneers, along with the careers of Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, and other singing cowboys are a rich, but separate, chapter of history.) Many of Nashville's recording stars made their screen debuts in low-budget films shot around Tennessee and Louisiana in the '60s. These were country cousins to Jailhouse Rock, independently produced and regionally distributed. The Man in Black's acting career (sidestepped in Walk The Line) began in 1961 with the no-budget thriller Five Minutes to Live/Door-to-Door Maniac, starring Cash as a singing kidnapper and a seven-year-old Ron Howard as his victim. Merle Haggard's first movie was Hillbillys [sic] in a Haunted House (1967) starring Basil Rathbone, John Carradine, and Lon Chaney Jr. These films, made for drive-in audiences, were not exactly genteel, but they avoided broaching subjects that might offend Christian audiences, so any references to drinking were limited to hokey jokes about "Grandpa's mountain dew."
In the record industry, however, country had become increasingly chic throughout the 1960s. Ray Charles kicked off a pop-to-country crossover trend with his albumModern Sounds in Country and Western Music in 1962. Three years later, Ringo covered the aforementioned hit "Act Naturally" on The Beatles' Help!. After that, the Byrds released Sweetheart of the Rodeo, Dylan put out Nashville Skyline, and piano-rocker Jerry Lee Lewis made a comeback with the hardcore honky-tonk album Another Place, Another Time. In 1972, Jerry Jeff Walker and Willie Nelson moved to Austin, where radio station KOKE coined the term "progressive country" to describe the local scene. In 1975, Nelson's concept album Red Headed Strangercrossed over into Billboard's pop charts, and was followed by the even more successful RCA Victor release Wanted! The Outlaws, a package of old recordings by Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Jessi Colter, and Tompall Glaser.
One of the first major movies with a country music soundtrack was Bonnie and Clyde, featuring "period" bluegrass by Flatt and Scruggs. Throughout the late '60s and early '70s, following the examples of Blackboard Jungle and Scorpio Rising, young and old auteurs experimented with film music, replacing the "through-composed" score of the classical Hollywood soundtrack with compilations of pop songs. Before Scorsese put the Ronettes and Johnny Ace in Mean Streets, Bob Rafelson put Tammy Wynette in Five Easy Pieces (1970) and Peter Bogdanovich dove into the Hank Williams catalogue for The Last Picture Show (1971). The opening credit sequence of John Huston's Fat City (1972) is a sunlit montage to Kris Kristofferson's "Help Me Make It Through The Night.". Fat City was also one of the earliest movies to depict barflies nodding off to the strains of pedal steel.
In 1973, the Canadian director Daryl Duke set the standard for country music movies in Payday. Rip Torn stars as the whiskey-bent-and-hellbound singer Maury Dann, such a roaring bastard that Waylon Jennings insisted he was the inspiration for the character. More likely, the film is modeled on the mythic mystery of Hank Williams' death—a chain of sleazy scenarios building to catastrophe. Maury is a monster, but no more so than all the leeches whose jobs depend on him. Payday is not a moral tale, but a satire about organized crime in the Bible Belt, about the "old rule" of Nashville that says all singers must start by paying their dues. Maury and his handlers are giving it up through the nose in payola and bribes to the cops. For all the knife-fighting, pill-popping, and backseat sex, the most chilling moments show Maury inhabiting his folksy star persona, nodding and grinning at the audience. In the opening sequence, he's performing in a small bar on a fuschia-lit stage. His fans are women of all ages, puffing on cigarettes and tapping their toes to his song, "She's Only A Country Girl," penned by Shel Siverstein. As his salty girlfriend glares on, Maury winks and smiles at two young, starstruck beauties sitting in different parts of the room; he'll find time to sleep with all three of them in the next 24 hours. (Altman imitated this sequence in Nashville, with Keith Carradine singing to the the triangle of Geraldine Chaplin, Lily Tomlin, and Cristina Raines.)
Unlike the estrogen den pictured at the beginning of Payday, the honky-tonks in Clint Eastwood's Western comedies are a working man's retreat, zesty '70s updates of the old-West swinging-door saloon. In Every Which Way But Loose(directed by James Fargo) and its sequel Any Which Way You Can (Buddy van Horn), Sandra Locke plays a no-good chanteuse, performing on bills with actual recording artists Charlie Rich, Mel Tillis, and Fats Domino. Eastwood stars as Philo Beddoe, a truck driver and bare-knuckles fighter who befriends the now infamous orangutan Clyde. These two films have been ignored even by many Eastwood apologists, but they deserve a second chance. Indeed primates are silly, but these are comedies after all, and compared to the bulk of today's blockbuster comedies, they look downright classy. (They are friendlier to women audiences than Ace VenturaAustin Powers, or any of the other fart-and-boner franchises of the past two decades.)
Eastwood has a gift for deadpan comedy and a love of music. In Bronco Billy, released in between the two Clyde flims, Eastwood hired Snuff Garrett, the record producer who had supervised the best-selling soundtrack for Every Which Way, to oversee the music. Garrett orchestrated a duet between Eastwood and Merle Haggard, "Bar Room Buddies," a celebration of honky-tonking (along with a similar duet for Eastwood and Ray Charles for Any Which Way You Can, the gleeful "Beers to You"). Locke also co-stars in Bronco Billy, as a bitchy heiress who finds herself mixed up with a band of carnies led by Eastwood in the title role. Here Clint further refined his comic persona as the leader of a wild west show. Though often dismissed as a "family film," Bronco Billy is Eastwood's dissertation on the tropes of the Western, the icons of "Americana," and the construction of identity in media culture. Ripe for reappraisal, the film also contains the quintessential honky-tonk scene. Clint and his posse are drinking at a bar where Merle Haggard is performing. In the course of a single song (the gorgeous "Misery and Gin," co-written by Garrett), Clint reinvents the honky-tonk as emotional inferno. The coworkers make a toast, then Locke launches into a monologue about her father's death; Clint advises her, "Go ahead, let the tears fall in that beer." They argue, and a moment later, they are dancing. Then a bar fight erupts, such a riot that Merle is forced to flee the stage. The atmosphere of sad music and flowing booze is so powerful that the director can skip over the normal expository process, quite believably condensing a spectrum of human passions—joy, anger, grief, sex, violence—into a few minutes. 
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The apotheosis of honky-tonk fever among American film critics is captured in theNew York Times of June 11, 1980, where Janet Maslin's favorable review of Bronco Billy ran alongside Vincent Canby's exaltation of Urban Cowboy ("the most entertaining, most perceptive commercial American movie of the year to date.")Cowboy represents a third kind of honky-tonk movie: the bar as battleground for the war of the sexes. Inspired by the smashing success of Saturday Night Fever, the film stars John Travolta, once again leading us into a regional subculture of late-night athleticism, a world of young people working dead-end jobs and channeling their physical, emotional, and mental energies into contests at dance clubs. The centerpiece is Gilley's in Pasadena, Texas, "The World's Largest Honky Tonk" and cradle of the mechanical bull craze.
While Urban Cowboy boosted the market for Stetson hats and pearl snap buttons, the Two Step and the Cotton-Eyed Joe, its "adult contemporary" soundtrack of the Eagles and Kenny Rogers inspired a backlash, summed up by the title of the obscure and charming Hard Country (1981). Starring Kim Basinger, Daryl Hannah, and singer Tanya Tucker, this film also examined the lives of a young Texan couple who toil in miserable jobs and spend their free time in a giant honky-tonk. No mechanical bull here—these are "cosmic cowboys" (a phrase coined by Michael Martin Murphey, whose songs fill the soundtrack), a brand of hard-partying rural groovers. They're not necessarily "progressive country," but they prefer Waylon to Kenny Rogers. Hard Country is a kitschy, low-budget affair, waffling between slapstick and melodrama. The cinematography is absurdly baroque—almost every scene contains zooming, deep-focus compositions and shots framed by windows, doors, and countertops. The set dressing looks like Dario Argento's idea of Texas. But in fact the film has a good sense of intended humor and much to say about the struggle for upward mobility and the crushing boredom of small-town life. It's a story about getting the hell out of Texas, more akin in its themes to The Last Picture Show than Urban Cowboy.
The high water mark for country music biopics is Michael Apted's Coal Miner's Daughter (1980), adapted from Loretta Lynn's bestselling autobiography. No mere impersonation, Sissy Spacek's incarnation of Miss Loretta—in her face and especially her voice—verges on the uncanny. A redheaded Tommy Lee Jones plays Doolittle, Loretta's husband-to-be, who returns to his hometown of Van Lear, Kentucky after a tour of duty overseas, determined to escape a life of claustrophobia and poverty. "There's a whole damn world out there. I don't intend to spend my life down in a coal mine," he tells Loretta, and endeavors to transform the constantly pregnant Loretta into a star. The success of her first single, "Honky-Tonk Girl," elevates her from rough roadhouse gigs to her debut on the Grand Ole Opry, and she transforms her style from hard country to countrypolitan pop. Spacek won an Oscar for this role. In 1983, Robert Duvall got Best Actor for Tender Mercies, directed by Australian Bruce Beresford and based on a screenplay by Horton Foote.Mercies stars Robert Duvall as Mac Sledge, a once-successful country singer who lands in the middle of nowhere on a bender and stays there, marrying a young mother (Tess Harper) who owns a gas station. He quits drinking and quits music, until he is spotted and mildly stalked by an aspiring country singer in his early twenties who convinces him to start songwriting again. (Duvall wrote two of the songs he performs in the film.)
Two Willie Nelson vehicles of note also rolled into theaters in the early '80s. Jerry Schatzberg's Honeysuckle Rose (1980), the origin of the famous song "On The Road Again," is a beautiful Texas travelogue and concert film (the redheaded gypsy is seen singing for a good half of its two-hour runtime). Set in a variety of venues from small bars to large arenas, the film represents the kind of touring bliss, with a bus full of friends and lovers, that Bad Blake might have enjoyed as a younger man. A film with wider appeal for those less interested in the Lone Star State is Alan Rudolph's 1984 Songwriter, co-starring Kristofferson and Torn. If Payday is a dark satire about the crooked underbelly of the music industry, Songwriter is a buddy comedy about the same. In a partly autobiographical role, Willie (who toiled as a songwriter in Nashville early in his career, penning "Crazy," "Funny How Time Slips Away," and dozens of other songs made famous by other people) stars as Doc, a financially and creatively frustrated composer and musician. Many times divorced, humbled by age, exhausted by touring, and sick of drinking, he takes a break from writing to manage a star named Blackie Buck (Kristofferson). Torn plays a nefarious, meth-gobbling promoter who eventually joins forces with Blackie and Doc to defeat an even more nefarious music publisher. Pauline Kael wrote a love letter toSongwriter in The New Yorker, doting on the the trio of gravel-throated goats (calling Nelson a "wild, frisky old pirate," Kristofferson a "chesty cavalier," and Torn a "speedier W.C. Fields") and delighting in their "three sets of beer-soaked whiskers lined up at a honky-tonk bar."
Songwriter may be the best movie ever made about country music. Rhinestone, also from 1984, may be the worst. Dolly Parton, working in the house band of a midtown Manhattan "cowboy bar," makes a bet with her boss that she can groom any human being into a country singer. Before she knows it, she's back home in Kentucky teaching Sylvester Stallone how to mosey bow-legged across a porch while ol' Grandpa sits drooling corn liquor on his overalls. (Believe me: The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas is Dolly's magnum opus. Rhinestone is her darkest hour.) The market for country-western movies was finally exhausted in 1985, after Jessica Lange got an Oscar nomination for lip-syncing to Patsy Cline in the dull, soap-operatic Sweet Dreams.
Country music movies all but disappeared from mainstream cinema that year. This was due in large part to the burgeoning empire of cable television. Two satellite networks, Country Music Television (CMT) and The Nashville Network (TNN), launched their "down-home" programming in 1983. In accordance with the business model of cable TV, these channels attracted advertisers by positioning country music as a specialized product for a niche audience. CMT targeted "family values" viewers and endeavored to teach them line-dancing. While a few of Nashville's "New Country" artists had talent  (Randy Travis, George Strait), most were gussied-up soft rockers like Sly Stone in his Stetson; critics referred to Garth Brooks, Clint Black, and Alan Jackson as "hat acts." In 1991, Billboard magazine adopted a new technology for tracking CD sales at retail chains through a barcoding system called Soundscan. For the first time, record companies had reliable market data on their demographics. They tailored their releases to suit the tastes of suburban mall shoppers. Today's artists who perform in the traditional honky-tonk style, like the Texas-based James Hand and Dale Watson, fall under the rubric of "alternative country."
Hollywood had little interest in New Country. In the '90s, only a few films touched on the subject of honky-tonk: the George Strait vehicle Pure Country (1992) and Bogdanovich's The Thing Called Love (1993). The Strait film, which enjoyed box office success, is an entertaining "king in disguise" fairytale about a disillusioned arena-packer who wants to go back to his honky-tonk days. Bogdanovich's movie, starring River Phoenix in his penultimate role (standing on top of a skyscraper and shouting, "Look out Music City, cause here I am and I ain't never leavin'!") and a not-yet-famous Sandra Bullock (traipsing around Nashville in footy pajamas),, is just cringe-inducing. Following these two blips on the screen, very few mainstream country-music movies of any note were released until Walk The Line.
Crazy Heart has a few direct links to the honky-tonk cycle. The first is Robert Duvall, who plays  Bad Blake's craggy old mentor, Wayne. A quiet counterpoint to Bridges, Duvall also seems to be inhabiting an older version of his character fromTender Mercies. Like Mercies, Crazy Heart depicts a chain of four intergenerational pairs: older man and younger woman; stepdad and stepson; estranged father and child; old musician and young disciple. The emphasis on mentoring was also a factor in the production of the film: Duvall took on Scott Cooper, a first-time writer, director, and producer, as his protégé, agreeing to anchor the project after Cooper showed him the screenplay. Duvall was the magnet that attracted Bridges, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Colin Farrell. The second connection is composer Stephen Bruton, who co-wrote several songs for both Crazy Heart and Songwriter. Bruton, who died last year, was a session guitarist, record producer, and solo artist who toured throughout the 1970s with Kristofferson. His industry experience is largely responsible for the musical authenticity of Crazy Heart. Bad Blake's style is true to the contemporary sound of the progressive country singers who survived the 70s, like Kristofferson, Guy Clark and the Flatlanders.
Oddly enough, Crazy Heart was funded partly by CMT, one of the major factors of the demise of the honky-tonk film. Throughout the 1990s, the cable network changed hands in several conglomerate mergers, and was eventually acquired by Viacom, which folded it into its MTV Networks division. CMT Films, which also produced the 2008 movie Beer for My Horses (a feature-length adaptation of Toby Keith and Willie Nelson's hit single of the same title) poured $7 million into Crazy Heart, helping to secure T. Bone Burnett as the music supervisor. The plan was to keep Crazy Heart under the Viacom umbrella and release the film through Paramount Vantage. When Vantage tanked, Viacom dropped Crazy Heart. The film lingered in distribution limbo until it was picked up by Fox Searchlight and reborn as the Cinderella of the Oscar season.  
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martes, 6 de agosto de 2013

The Complete Buddy Holly - 10CD - Purple Chick

The Complete Buddy Holly - 10CD - Purple Chick

The Complete Buddy Holly assembled in 2005 by a community of music fans who go by the name of Purple Chick. Its comprehensiveness rivals the official MCA 6-LP box set, The Complete Buddy Holly, first released in 1981 and long out-of-print. The MCA set has never been issued on CD...




Volume One
1: My Two Timin' Woman (Snow)
c.1949: Home Recording, 3315, 36th Street, Lubbock, Texas
Buddy Holly: vocal, acoustic guitar
2: I 'll Just Pretend (Martin)
3: Take These Shackles From My Heart (King-Stewart)
c. 1952: Home Recording, 3315, 36th Street, Lubbock Texas
Bob Montgomery (poss. Jack Neal): lead vocal, guitar; Buddy Holly: second vocal, mandolin
4: Footprints In The Snow (Jones)
c:1953: (Prob.) Home Recording, 3315, 36th Street, Lubbock, Texas
Bob Montgomery: lead vocal, guitar; Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar
5: Gotta Get You Near Me Blues+ (Montgomery)
6: Flower Of My Heart* (Montgomery-Guess)
7: Door To My Heart* (Montgomery)
8: I Gambled My Heart+ (Holly-Montgomery)
9: Soft Place In My Heart+ (Montgomery)
10: Gotta Get You Near Me Blues+ (Montgomery)
c. late 1954/April 1955: Nesman Recording Studio - Wichita Falls Texas
Bob Montgomery: lead vocal, acoustic guitar; Buddy Holly: duet vocal, electric lead guitar; Sonny Curtis: fiddle; Larry Welborn: bass on *; Don Guess: steel guitar on *, bass on +
6-10: plus overdubs: 6 October, 1963 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar, Stan Lark: bass; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Lyn Bailey: bass; Doug Roberts: drums)
11: You And I Are Through* (Montgomery)
12: Memories (Montgomery)
13: You And I Are Through* (Montgomery)
14: Baby It's Love (Bob Montgomery-Ella Holley)
15: Memories (Montgomery)
16: Queen Of The Ballroom (Don Guess)
August, 1955: KDAV Studio - Lubbock, Texas
Bob Montgomery: lead vocal, acoustic guitar; Buddy Holly: duet vocal, second lead guitar; Sonny Curtis: fiddle, lead guitar on *; Don Guess: bass
13-16: plus overdubs: 26 June 1964 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark or Lyn Bailey: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums)
17: Baby Let's Play House (Gunter)
18: Down The Line (Holly-Montgomery)
19: Baby Let's Play House (Gunter)
20: Down The Line (Holly-Montgomery)
Mid 1955: Nesman Recording Studio - Wichita Falls, Texas
Buddy Holly: lead vocal, acoustic guitar; Bob Montgomery: vocal and guitar on *; Sonny Curtis: lead guitar; Larry Welborn: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
19-20: plus overdubs: June 1964 - The Firebalk: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums)
21: Moonlight Baby (Holly (aka Baby Won't You Come Out Tonight)
22:1 Guess I Was A Fool (Holly)
23: Don't Come Back Knockin' (Holly-Parrish)
24: Love Me (Holly-Parrish)
7 December, 1955: Nesman Recording Studio - Wichita Falls, Texas
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Sonny Curtis: lead guitar; Don Guess: bass; Jerry Allison: drums (These acetates were sent to Decca in response to a telegram from Eddie Crandall to Dave Stone)
25: Love Me (Holly-Parrish) (Take 10)
26: Don't Come Back Knockin' (Holly-Parrish)
27: Midnight Shift (Lee-Ainsworth)
28: Blue Days, Black Nights (Hall)
26 January, 1956: Bradley's Barn Studio - Music Row, Nashville, Tennessee (Owen Bradley: producer)
Buddy Holly: vocal; Sonny Curtis: lead guitar; Grady Martin: rhythm guitar; Don Guess: bass; Doug Kirkham: percussion
29: Baby Won't You Come Out Tonight+ (Holly)
30: I Guess I Was Just A Fool+ ~Holly)
31: It's Not My Fault (Hall-Myrick)
32: I'm Gmlna Set My Foot Down*+ (Holly)
33: Changill' All Those Changes*+ (Holly)
34: Rock-A-Bye Rock+ (Holly)
35: Bccause I Love You+ (Holly)
February-April, 1956: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street Clovis New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Sonny Curtis: guitar, lead guitar on *; Don Guess: bass; Jerry Allison: drums on +

Volume Two
1: Baby Won't You Come Out Tonight (Holly)
2: Because I Love You (Holly)
3: Changin' All Those Changes (Holly)
4: I 'm Gonna Set My Foot Down (Holly)
5: It's Not My Fault (Hall-Myrick)
6: Rock-A-Bye Rock (Holly)
Feb-Apr 1956 session from disc 1 plus overdubs: 14 November 1962 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums)
7: Rock Around With Ollie Vee (Curtis) (fragment)
8: Rock Around With Ollie Vee (Curtis) (take 8)
9: I'm Changin' All Those Changes* (Holly) (take 3 fragment)
10: I'm Changin' All Those Changes* (Holly) (take 4)
11: That'll Be The Day (Alllson-Holly-Petty) (take 19)
12: Girl On My Mind (Guess) (take 3)
13: Ting-A-Ling (Nugetre) (take 7)
22 July, 1956: Bradley's Barn Studio - Music Row, Nashville, Tennessee (Owen Bradley: producer)
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Sonny Curtis: guitar, lead on *; Don Guess: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
14: Rock Around With Ollie Vee (Curtis) (take 12)
15: Modern Don Juan (Guess-Neil) (take 76 [sic])
16: You're My One Desire (Guess) (false start)
17: You're My One Desire (Guess) (take 2)
15 Nov, 1956: Bradley's Barn Studio - Music Row, Nashville, Tennessee (Owen Bradley: producer)
Buddy Holly: vocal; Harold Bradley: guitar; Grady Martin: guitar; Don Guess: bass; Floyd Cramer: piano; Farris Coursey: drums; E.R. "Dutch" McMillin: saxophone
18: Gone (Rogers) (version one)
19: Gone (Rogers) (version two)
20: Gone (Rogers) (version three)
21: Have You Ever Been Lonely (De Rose-Brown) (version one)
22: Have You Ever Been Lonely (De Rose-Brown) (version two)
23: Have You Ever Been Lonely (De Rose Brown) (version three)
24: Have You Ever Been Lonely (De Rose-Brown) (version four)
25: Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (Berry)
26: Good Rockin' Tonight (Brown)
27: Rip It Up (Marascalco-Blackwell)
28: Blue Monday (Bartholomew-Domino)
29: Honky Tonk (Doggett-Shepard-Butler-Scott)
30: Blue Suede Shoes (Perkins)
31: Shake, Rattle and Roll (Calhoun)
32: Bo Diddley (McDaniel)
33: Ain't Got No Home (Henry)
34: Holly Hop (Holley)
35: Gone (Rogers) (version three)
36: Rip It Up (Marascalco-Blackwell)
37: Honky Tonk (Doggett-Shepard-Butler-Scott)
38: Blue Suede Shoes (Perkins)
39: Shake, Rattle and Roll (Calhoun)
40: Have You Ever Been Lonely (De Rose-Brown) (version one)
41: Good Rockin' Tonight (Brown)
42: Blue Monday (Bartholomew-Domino)
43: Ain 't Got No Home (Henry)
44: Holly Hop (Holley)
November-December, 1956: (Poss.) Home Recording - 1926, 19th Street, Lubbock, Texas
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Jerry Allison: drums and vocals; (Poss.) Don Guess: bass
35-39: plus overdubs: 10/11 October, 1963 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts: drums); Vi Petty: piano
40-44: plus overdubs: 22 August, 1968 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Lyn Bailey or Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts: drums)

Space here to tell you a little about this collection. Over a year in the making, we snagged everything we could find from numerous sources, including What You Been A Missin' and The Music Never Died. One thing we didn't include was any of the "Picks" vocal overdubs from the 1980s, frankly because we think they suck. You can find them on all manner of budget CDs. But you really don't want to. Tracks making their CD debut include the 7" versions of "Wait Til The Sun Shines Nellie", "Look At Me" and "Mailman...", and the 50s and 60s stereo mixes on Disc Nine.

As well as our new, previously unavailable stereo mixes, we managed to dig out one or two exclusives: "Take These Shackles..." on disc one is not only upgraded in sound, but appears without skips for the first time! Also making their bootleg debut (we think) are the BBC "Maybe Baby" and Florida "That'll Be The Day" fragments and the first version of "That's What They Say". We're not sure whether the Hightime fragment is lip-synched or sung live to the record, but it debuts here all the same.

We did minimal work on the source material if it warranted it - mostly de-clicking and speed-correction. Also, we fixed the tape glitch on the Palladium "Oh Boy" and combined two different sources of "My Two-Timin Woman" to get the longest version in best quality. When speed-corrected the Vigotone "Last Night" and "Send Me Some Lovin'" turn out not to be alternate takes, just undubbed.

Volume Three
1: Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (Berry)
2: Bo Diddley (McDaniel)
3: Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (Berry)
4: Bo Diddley (McDaniel)
December 1956-January 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Larry Welborn: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; unknown: guitar
3-4: plus overdubs: 22 August, 1968 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums)
5: I'm Looking For Someone To Love (Holly-Petty)
6: That'll Be The Day (Allison-Holly-Petty)
25 February, 1957: Norman Petty Studios -1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Larry Welborn: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Niki Sullivan, Gary Tollett and Ramona Tollett: backing vocals
7: Last Night (Petty-Mauldin)
8: Maybe Baby* (Holly-Petty)
9: Words Of Love (Holly)
10: Last Night+ (Petty-Mauldin)
11: Maybe Baby* (Holly-Petty)
12 March, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar, Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Niki Sullivan: second vocal*
The Picks (Bill Pickering, John Pickering, Bob Latham) backing vocals on + (dubbed 12-14 Oct '57)
11: plus overdubs: 15 March, 1966 - The Fireballs: (see above - Doug Roberts: drums)
12 Words Of Love* (Holly)
13: Mailman Bring Me No More Blues+ (Roberts-Katz-Clayton)
14: Mailman Bring Me No More Blues+ ((Roberts-Katz-Clayton)
8 April, 1957 Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal (double-tracked on *), guitar (double-tracked on *); Jerry Allison: drums; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Vi Petty: piano on +
14: plus echo overdub for 7": October 1961: Decca Record Co., Ltd., 254 Belsize Road, London, England
15: Not Fade Away (Hardin-Petty) (incomplete alternate)
16: Not Fade Away+ (Hardin-Petty)
17: Everyday* (Hardin-Petty)
29 May, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Jerry Allison: cardboard-box (knee slapping on *); (Prob.) Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Vi Petty: celeste on *; Buddy Holly, Jerry Allison, Niki Sullivan: overdubbed vocals on +
18: Ready Teddy* (Blackwell-Marascalco)
19: Valley Of Tears# (Domino-Bartolomew)
20: Tell Me How+ (Hardin-Allison-Petty)
May-July, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Niki Sullivan: guitar on * and +; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Vi Petty: piano on * and #; Norman Petty: organ on #
The Picks (Bill Pickering, John Pickering, Bob Latham) backing vocals on + (dubbed 12-14 Oct '57)
21: Peggy Sue (Holly-Allison-Petty) (alternate)
22: Peggy Sue (Holly-Allison-Petty)
23: Listen To Me* (Hardin-Petty)
24: That'll Be The Day - for Bob Thiele (Holly-Allison)
25: That'll Be The Day - for Murray Deutch (Holly-Allison)
26: That'll Be The Day - for Bill Randall (Holly-Allison)
27: Oh Boy (West-Tilghman-Petty)
28: Oh Boy+ (West-Tilghman-Petty)
30 June, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar (double-tracked v & g on *), Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
The Picks (Bill Pickering, John Pickering, Bob Latham) backing vocals on + (dubbed 19 August '57)
29: I'm Gonna Love You Too (Mauldin-Petty-Sullivan)
1 July, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: double-tracked vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Cricket: chirp
30: Send Me Some Loving (Marascalco-Price)
31: It's Too Late (Willis)
32: Send Me Some Loving+ (Marascalco-Price)
33: It's Too Late+ (Willis)
20 July, 1957: Norman Petty Studios -1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
The Picks (Bill Pickering, John Pickering, Bob Latham) backing vocals on + (dubbed 12-14 Oct '57)
34: Am Empty Cup+ (Petty-Orbison)
35: Rock Me My Baby+ (Long-Heather)
36: You've Got Love+ (Wilson-Orbison-Petty)
37: Maybe Baby+ (Holly-petly)
28-29 September, 1957: The Officers Club Lounge - Tinker U.S. Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, OK
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar, Niki Sullivan: guitar, Joe B. Mauldin: bass, Jerry Allison: drums
The Picks (Bill Pickering, John Pickering, Bob Latham) backing vocals on + (dubbed 12-14 Oct '57)
38: That'll Be The Day (Holly-Allison-Petty) (fragment)
22 October, 1957: KPTV Hightime, Portland Oregon
Buddy Holly: mimed (double-tracked?) vocal; Joe B. Mauldin and Jerry Allison: mimed vocal
39: That'll Be The Day (Holly-Allison-Petty)
40: Peggy Sue (Holly-Allison-Petty)
41: Interview with Ed Sullivan
1 December, 1957: Ed Sullivan Show, CBS Television Studios, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Niki Sullivan: guitar

Volume Four 
1: Little Baby (Holly-Petty-Kendall)
2: (You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care (Leiber-Stoller)
3: Look At Me (Holly-Petty-Allison)
4: Look At Me (Holly-Petty-Allison)
7 December, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin; bass, Jerry Allison: drums; C.W. Kendall Jr.: piano
4: plus echo overdub for 7: October 1961: Decca Record Co. Ltd. 254 Belsize Road London England
5: Mona (McDaniel) (warm up)
6: Mona (McDaniel) (take one)
7. Mona (McDaniel) (take two)
8: Mona (McDaniel) (take three)
December, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Jerry Allison: drums; guitar at beginning
9: Peggy Sue (Holly-Allison-Petty)
29 December, 1957: Arthur Murray Dance Party, TV Show - New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
10: Rave On (West-Tilghman-Petty) (take 3)
11: That's My Desire (Kresa-Loveday) (rehearsal)
12: That's My Desire (Kresa-l.oveday) (take I - false start)
13: That's My Desire (Kresa-Loveday) (take 2 breakdown)
14: That's My Desire (Kresa-l.oveday) (take 3)
15: That s My Desire+ (Kresa-Loveday) (take 3)
25 January, 1958: Bell Sound Studios - 237 W. 54th Street, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Norman Petty: piano; Al Caiola: lead guitar; Donald Arnone: rhythm guitar; The Jivetones: (William Marine, Robert Bollinger, Robert Harter, Abby Hoffer, Merrill Ostaus): backing vocals
15: plus overdubs: 15 March 1966 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts: drums)
16: Oh Boy (West-Tilghman-Petty)
26 January, 1958: Ed Sullivan Show, CBS Television Studios, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
17: Well... All Right (Holly-Allison-Petty-Mauldin)
12 February, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: cymbals
18: Take Your Time* (Holly-Petty) (take I breakdown)
19: Take Your Time* (Holly-Petty) (take 2 - breakdown)
20: Take Your Time* (Holly-Peity) (take 3)
21: Take Your Time* (Holly-Pelty) (take 4)
22: Fool's Paradise (Leglaire-Petty-l.insley) (take 1)
23: Fool's Paradise (Leglaire-Petty-Linsley) (take 2)
24: Fool's Paradise (I.eglaire-Petty-Linsley) (take 3)
25: Thhlk It Over (Holly-Petty-Allison) (take 1 - false start)
26: Think It Over (Holly-Petty-Allison) (take 2 - false start)
27: Think It Over (Holly-Petty-Allison) (take 3)
28: Think It Over (Holly-Petty-Allison) (take 4)
29: Think It Over (Holly-Petty-Allison) (take 5)
30: Fool's Paradise+ (Leglaire-Petty-Linsley) (take 3)
31: Think It Over+ (Holly-Petty- Allison) (take 5)
14 February, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums, cardboard-box on *; Norman Petty: organ on *- plus The Roses (Robert Linville, Ray Rush, David Bigham) backing vocals on +; Vi Petty: piano on + (overdubbed: 19 February, 1958)
32: That'll Be The Day* (Allison-Holly-Petty) (fragment)
33: Everyday* (Hardin-Petty) (fragment)
34: Drown In My Own Tears+ (fragment)
35: Hallelujah, I Love Her So + (Charles) (Glover) (fragment)
24 February, 1958: "Big Gold Record Stars Show" - Dade County Auditorium, Miami, Florida
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass on *; Jerry Allison: drums on *; Jerry Lee Lewis: piano and vocal on +
36: That'll Be The Day (Allison-Holly-Petty)
37: Peggy Sue (Holly-Allison-Petty)
38: Oh Boy (West-Tilghman-Petty)
2 March, 1958: The London Palladium - Argyle Street, London, England
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
39: Maybe Baby (Holly-Petty) (fragment)
14 March,1958: BBC Television studios - Lime Grove, London, England
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
40: Heartbeat* (Montgomery-Petty)
41: Lonesome Tears+ (Holly)
42: It's So Easy+ (Holly-Petty)
25 May, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Tommy Allsup: lead guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass on +; Jerry Allison: drums on +; George Atwood: bass on *; plus The Roses (Robert Linville, Ray Rush, David Bigham): backing vocals on + (overdubbed: 27 May, 1958)
43: Love's Made A Fool Of You (Holly-Montgomery)
44: Wishing (Holly-Montgomery)
45: Love's Made A Fool Of You+ (Holly-Montgomery)
46: Wishing ++ (Holly-Montgomery)
2 June, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: double-tracked vocal, guitar; Tommy Allsup: lead guitar; George Atwood: bass; Bo Clarke: drums - 45-46: plus overdubs: January 7, 1964 - handclaps on +; 1963 guitar overdubs on ++

Volume Five 
1: Early In The Morning (Darin-Harris)
2: Now We're One (Darin) (fragment)
3: Now We're One (Darin)
19 June, 1958: Coral Records Studios - The Pythian Temple, 80th Street, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal; George Barnes: lead guitar; Al Chernet: acoustic guitar; Sanford Bloch: bass; Ernest Hayes: piano; David "Panama" Francis: drums; Philip Kraus: drums; Sam Taylor: alto saxophone; Helen Way Singers: (Helen Way, Harriett Young, Maeretha Stewart, Theresa Merritt): backing vocals
4: Everyday KLLL Jingle (Holly)
5: Peggy Sue KLLL Jingle (Holly-Alllson)
1 September, 1958: Radio KLLL - Lubbock, Texas
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar
6: Come Back Baby (Petty-Nell)
7: Reminiscing (Curtis) (Buddy wrote this, but gave King Curtis the credit for flying down to the session)
8: Reminiscing + (Curtis)
10 September, 19S8: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Jerry Allison: drums; Curtis "King Curtis" Ousley: saxophone
8: plus overdubs: 14 November, 1962 - The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Eric Budd: drums)
9: True Love Ways (Holly-Petty) (stereo)
10: It Doesn't Matter Anymore (Anka) (stereo)
11: Raining In My Heart (B & F Bryant) (stereo)
12: Moondreams (Petty) (stereo)
13: True Love Ways (Holly-Petty) (mono)
14: It Doesn't Matter Anymore (Anka) (mono)
15: Raining In My Heart (B & F Bryant) (mono)
16: Moondreams (Petty) (mono)
21 October, 1958: Coral Records Studios - Pythian Temple,80th Street, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal; Al Caiola: acoustic guitar; Sanford Bloch: bass; Ernest Hayes: piano; Doris Johnson: harp; Clifford Leeman: drums; Abraham Richman: tenor saxophone; Sylvan Shulman, Leo Kruczek, Leonard Posner, Irving Spice, Ray Free, Herbert Bourne, Julius Held, Paul Winter: violin, David Schwartz Howard Kay: viola, Maurice Brown, Maurice Bialkin: cello
9-12 Mixed for stereo 1979. Alternate stereo mixes of 9, 10 and 11 from 1959 and 1967 on disc nine.
17: That's What They Say (Holly) (version I - incomplete)
18: That's What They Say (Holly) (version 2)
19: What To Do (Holly)
20: Peggy Sue Got Married (Holly)
21: That Makes It Tough (Holly)
22: Crying, Waiting, Hoping (Holly)
23: Learning The Game (Holly)
3 December, 1958 (17-19); S December, 1958 (20); 8 December, 1958 (21); 14 December, 1958
(22); 17 December, 1958 (23): Apartment 4-H, The Brevoort, 8th Street, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal, acoustic guitar
24: You're The One (Holly-Jennings-Corbin)
27 December, 19S8: Radio KLLL. - Lubbock, Texas
Buddy Holly: vocal, guitar; Waylon Jennings: handclapping; Ray "Slim" Corbin: handclapping
25: Wait 'Til The Sun Shines Nellie* (Sterling-Von Tilzer)
26: Slippin' And Slidin'* (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (Slow version # 1)
27: Slippin' And Slidin'* (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (slow version # 3)
28: Slippin' And Slidin' (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Snulh) (slow version # 2)
29: Slippin' And Slidin' (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (fast version)
30: Drown In My Own Tears (Glover) (fragment)
31: Maria Elena
32: Dearest (McDaniel-Polk-Baker) (version 1 - incomplete)
33: Dearest (McDaniel-Polk-Baker) (version 2)
34: Love Is Strange (Smith-Baker)
35: Smokey Joe's Cafe (Leiber-Stoller)
36: Smokey Joe's Cafe (Leiber-Stoller) (unedited)
37: Buddy's Guitar (Holly) (aka I Know I'll Have
The Blues Again aka Leave My Womam Alone)
1-20 January, 1959: Apartment 4-H, The Brevoort,8th Street, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal, acoustic guitar, electric guitar on *
38: Slippin' And Slidin'* (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (sped-up version # 1)
39: Slippin' And Slidin'* (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (sped-up version # 3)
40: Slippin' And Slidin' (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (sped-up version # 2)
1-20 January, 1959: Apartment 4-H, The Brevoort, 8th Street, New York City, New York
Buddy Holly: vocal, acoustic guitar, electric guitar on *
Buddy deliberately recorded these songs at a slow tempo, with the tape running at half-speed (71/2 i.p.s. versus 15 i.p.s.) so they would sound like The Chipmunks when played back!

Volume Six 
1: Peggy Sue Got Married (Holly)
2: Crying, Waiting, Hoping (Holly)
overdubbed 30 June, 1959: Coral Records Studio A, New York City, New York
Andrew Ackers: piano; David 'Panama' Francis: drums; Sandford Block: bass; The Ray Charles Singers: backing vocals; C. John "Jack" Hansen: producer
3: That's What They Say (Holly) (take 2)
4: What To Do (Holly)
5: Learning The Game (Holly)
6: That Makes It Tough (Holly)
overdubbed 1 January, 1960: Coral Records Studlo A, New York City, New York
Andrew Ackers: piano; David 'Panama' Francis: drums; Sandford Block: bass; The Ray Charles Singers: backing vocals; C tohn "Jack" Hansen: producer
Mixed for stereo in 1979. Alternate stereo mixes of 4 and 5 from 1967 are on disc nine of this set.
7: What To Do (Holly)
8: Peggy Sue Got Married (Holly)
9: Crying, Waiting, Hoping (Holly)
10: That Makes It Tough (Holly)
11: That's What They Say (Holly) (version 2)
12: Learning The Game (Holly)
overdubbed June 1962-December 1963: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, NM
The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums); Norman Petty: producer
13: You're The One (Holly-Jennings-Corbin)
overdubbed June 1962-December 1963: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, NM
The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Jimmy Glimer: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts: drums); Norman Petty: Onedeoline, Producer
14: Umm, Oh Yeah (Dearest) (McDaniel-Polk-Baker) (version 2)
15: Slippin' And Slidin' (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (slow version #2)
overdubbed 1962-1963: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums); Norman Petty: producer
16: Wait 'Til The Sun Shines Nellie (Sterling-Von Tilzer) (single version)
17: Wait 'Til The Sun Shines Nellie (Sterling-Von Tilzer) (album version with additional overdubbing)
overdubbed 29 October 1962: Norman Petty Studios -1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts or Eric Budd: drums); poss. Vi Petty, George Tomsco, Homer Tankersley: backing vocals; Norman Petty: producer
18: Love Is Strange+ (Smith-Baker)
19: Slippin ' And Slidin ' (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) (fast version)
20: Dearest* (McDaniel-Polk-Baker) (version 2)
21: Smokey Joe's Cafe* (Leiber-Stoller)
overdubbed 1968: Norman Petty Studios -1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
The Fireballs: (George Tomsco: guitar; Keith McCormack: rhythm guitar; Stan Lark: bass; Doug Roberts: drums); Norman Petty: Onedeoline on +; poss. Vi Petty, Barbara Tomsco, George Tomsco, Homer Tankersley: backing vocals on *; Norman Petty: producer
22: Peggy Sue Got Married (Holly)
overdubbed 1995, Abbey Road Studios, London, England
The Hollies: (Allan Clarke, Graham Nash, Tony Hicks: vocals; Tony Hicks: rhythm and lead guitar; Bobby Elliott: drums; Ian Parker: keyboards; Ray Stiles: bass; Alan Coates: percusslon)
23: Got To Get You Near Me Blues (Montgomery)
24: Memories (Montgomery)
25: Baby Let's Play House (Gunter)
26: Last Night (Petty-Mauldin)
27: Oh Boy (West-Tilghman-Petty)
28: Send Me Some Loving (Marascalco-Price)
29: It's Too Late (Willis)
30: That's My Desire (Kresa-Loveday)
31: Fool's Paradise (Leglaire-Petty-Linsley)
32: Think It Over (Holly-Petty-Allison)
33: Love's Made A Fool Of You (Holly-Montgomery)
34: Wishing (Holly-Montgomery)
True stereo versions - For The First Time Anywhere!!
Created by Purple Chick synchronizing the dubbed and undubbed versions that appear earlier on this set.
(Undubbed versions are panned mostly left, the dubbed versions mostly right.)

Volume Seven 
1: I Saw The Moon Cry Last Night (Neal) - Jack Neal
2: I Hear The Lord Callin' For Me (Neal) - Jack Neal
c. 10 November 1953: Radio KDAV - 6602 Quirt Avenue, Lubbock, Texas
Jack Neal: vocal, guitar; Buddy Holly: guitar
3: All From Loving You* Hall) - Ben Hall
4: Rose Of Monterey+ (Hall) - Ben Hall
c. 1955: Radio KSEL, Lubbock, Texas(*); Radio KDAV - 6602 Quirt Avenue, Lubbock, Texas(+)
Ben Hall: vocal; Buddy: guitar; Sonny Curtis: fiddle; Weldon Myrick: steel guitar; Dena Hall: bass
5: Because You Love Me (Curtis) - Sonny Curtis
6: I'll Miss My Heart (Inman) - Sonny Curtis
7: Queen Of The Ballroom (Guess) - Sonny Curtis
8: This Bottle (Curtis) - Sonny Curtis
9: Dallas Boogie (Curtis) - Sonny Curtis
10: One In A Million (Curtis) - Sonny Curtis
7 June 1955: (Prob.) Nesman Recording Studio - Wichita Falls, Texas;
Sonny Curtis: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; Larry Welborn: bass; Jerry Allison: drums
1l: Go Boy Go* (Wilson) - Gary Dale
12: Gone* (Rogers) - Gary Dale
13: Go Boy Go+ (Wilson) - Gary Dale
14: Gone+ (Rogers) - Gary Dale
15: The Golden Rocket+ (Snow) - Gary Dale
16: 1 Overlooked An Orchid+ (Story-Smith-Lyn) - Gary Dale
21 February, 1957: Radio KDAV - Lubbock Texas (*)
1 March, 1957: Norman Petty Studios -13i3 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico (+)
Gary Dale Tollett: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; 3erry Allison: drums; Ramona Tollett, June Clark, Niki Sullivan: backing vocals
17: A Whole Lot Of Lovin' (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) (take I ) - Jim Robinson
18: A Whole Lot Of Lovin' (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) (take 2) - Jim Robinson
19: A Wbole Lot Of Lovin' (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) (take 3) - Jim Robinson
20: A Whole Lot Of Lovin'+ (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) (take 3) - Jim Robinson
21: It's A Wonderful Feeling* (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) - Jim Robinson
28 April, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Jim Robinson: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; Jerry Allison: cardboard-box percussion, drums on *; Vi Petty: piano on *; (Poss.) Joe B. Mauldin: bass; The Bowman Brothers: backing vocals on *, plus The Roses (Robert Linville, Ray Rush, David Bigham) backing vocals on + (dubbing date unknown)
22 Starlight (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) - Jack Huddle
23: Believe Me* (Petty-Robinson) - Jack Huddle
28 April, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Jack Huddle: vocal; Buddy Holly: lead guitar; Jerry Allison: drums; (Poss.) Joe B. Mauldin: bass; The Bowman Brothers: backing vocal on *; Vi Petty: piano on *
24: By The Mission Wall (Cline) - Fred Crawford
April-June, 1957 (or 14 July, 1957): Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, NM
Fred Crawford: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; 3erry Allison: drums; (Poss.) Joe B. Mauldin- bass; (Poss.) Norman Petty: organ; (Poss.) The Bowman Brothers: backing vocals
25: A Man From Texas (Russell-Petty-Dougherty)- Jim Robinson
24 June, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Jim Robinson: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; (Poss.) George Atwood: bass; Unknown: drums; Vi Petty: piano; The Picks: backing vocals (overdubbed mid-August, 1957)
26: Broken Promises (Davis) - Sherry Davis
27: Humble Heart* (Davis) - Sherry Davis
prob. 12 July, 1957: Norman Petty Studios -1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Sherry Davis: vocal; Buddy Holly: lead guitar; Jack Vaughn: rhythm guitar; Jerry Allison: drums; Unknown: bass; The Picks: backing vocals; Gene Medley: backing vocals on *
28: Look To The Future* (Petty-Sullivan) - Gary Dale
29: Houey Honey (Tollett) - Gary Dale
14 July, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Gary Dale Tollett: vocal, guitar on *; Buddy Holly: guitar; 3erry Allison: drums; (Poss.) Joe B. Mauldin: bass; Ramona Tollett: backing vocal; The Picks: backing vocals (overdubbed mid-Aug.1957)
30: Sugartime (Phillips-Echols) (version 1) - Charlie Phillips
31: Sugartime (Phillips-Echols) (version 2) - Charlie Phillips
32: One Faded Rose* (Echols-Baggett-Phillips) (version 1) - Charlie Phillips
33: One Faded Rose* (Echols-Baggett-Phillips) (version 2) - Charlie Phillips
July 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Charlie Phillips: vocal; Buddy Holly: lead guitar, harmony vocal on *; Jack Vaughn: acoustic guitar; Jerry Allison: drums; Jimmy Blakely: steel guitar; George Atwood: bass

Discs Seven and Eight compile all circulating sessions featuring Buddy as a side musician and/or producer, plus songs Buddy wrote that he never recorded, with others finishing the compositions posthumously. Others exist, and may yet escape ( "I Sent You Roses" by Jerry Engler is due to be released later in 2005).

Some tracks, which erroneously appeared on previous compilations, have been excluded:
Buddy shared a session with Billly Walker on 12 March, 1957, but does not feature on Billy's recordings.
"When Sin Stops" by The Nighthawks (Hamilton 50006), on the Vigotone set does not feature Buddy.
Similarly, "Oh Boy!" on the Vigotone Set is by Billy And The Glens (Jaro 77006), not Sonny West.
The contemptible "Ni**er Hatin' Me" was recorded in the late 60s(!) by Johnny Rebel (CJ. Trahan).

Volume Eight
1: Moondreams (Petty) (album version) - The Norman Petty Trio
2: Moondreams* (Petty) (single version) - The Norman Petty Trio
3: Moondreams+ (Petty) (alternate version) - The Norman Petty Trio
20-22 July, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Buddy Holly: acoustic guitar; Norman Petty: organ; Vi Petty: piano; Mike Mitchell: percussion; Unknown: bass; The Picks: overdubbed vocals on *; The Roses: overdubbed vocals on +
(1 and 2 are the same version, but 3 is a different recording/take entirely.)
4: Don't Do Me This Way (Tucker) - Rick Tucker
5: Patty Baby (Baker-Tucker) - Rick Tucker
25 August, 1957: Norman Petty Studios -1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Rick Tucker: vocal, poss. guitar; Buddy Holly: lead guitar or (Poss.) Roy Orbison: lead guitar; (Poss.) Bo Clarke: drums; (Poss.) Don Guess: bass; Bill Pickering and Bob Lapham: backing vocal
6: Don't Do Me This Way (Tucker) Rick Tucker
12 September, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Rick Tucker: vocal; Buddy Holly: acoustic guitar or (Poss.) Rick Tucker: acoustic guitar; Vi Petty: piano; (Poss.) Bo Clarke: drums; (Poss.) Don Guess: bass; The Picks: backing vocals
7: Real Wild Child (O'Keefe-Greenan-Owens) (take 1)- Ivan
8: Real Wild Child* (O'Keefe-Greenan-Owens) (take 2) - Ivan
9: Oh, You Beautiful Doll (Brown-Ayer) (take 1) - Ivan
10: Oh, You Beautiful Doll (Brown-Ayer) (take 2) - Ivan
11: Oh, You Beautiful Doll+ (Brown-Ayer) (take 2) - Ivan
19 February, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - i313 West 7th Street, Clovis New Mexico
Jerry "Ivan" Allison: vocal, overdubbed drumsticks on +; Buddy Holly: guitar, overdubbed lead guitar, backing vocal on *, Joe B. Mauldin: bass, backing vocal on *; Bo Clarke: drums, backing vocal on *; Norman Petty: overdubbed water-filled wine glasses on +
12: Scarlet Ribbons (.Siegal-Danzig) - Carolyn Hester
13: Wreck Of The Old '97* (traditional) - Carolyn Hester
1958: Norman Petty Studio - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Carolyn Hester: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; George Atwood: bass (*); Jerry Allison: percussion (*)
14: What A' You Gonna Do (Engler) - Jerry Engler
7 September, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Jerry Engler: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar, bells; George Atwood: bass; Bo Clarke: drums
15: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take I - instrumental) - Waylon Jennings
16: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take 2 - instrumental) - Waylon Jennings
17: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take 3 - instrumental) - Waylon Jennings
18: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take 4 - vocal) - Waylon Jennings
19: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take 5 - vocal) - Waylon Jennings
20: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take 6 - vocal) - Waylon Jennings
21: When Sin Stops+ (Venable) (take 2) - Waylon Jennings
22: Jole Blon (Choates-York) - Waylon Jennings
10 September, 1958: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
Waylon Jennings: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; George Atwood: bass; Bo Clarke: drums; Curtis "King Curtis" Ousley: tenor saxophone; The Roses backing vocals overdubbed on +
23: Stay Close To Me (Holly) (false start) - Lou Giordano
24: Stay Close To Me (Holly) (take 4) - Lou Giordano
25: Don't Cha Know* (Everly) - Lou Giordano
30 September, 1958: Beltone Recording Studio, New York City, New York
Lou Giordano: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar; Phil Everly: guitar; Unknown: bass guitar; Unknown: drums; Buddy Holly, Joey Villa, Phil Everly: falsetto vocals on *
26: More And More (Jennings) - Waylon Jennings
27: When You Are Lonely (Jennings) - Waylon Jennings
27 December, 1958: Radio KLLL. - Lubbock, Texas
Waylon Jennings: vocal; Buddy Holly: guitar
28: My Best Friend (My Baby's Coming Home) (Holly-Turner-Nilsson)
29: My Baby's Coming Home (Holly-Turner-Nilsson)
May, 1962: American Studios, Hollywood, California
Harry Nilsson: vocal; Scotty Turner: guitar, production
29: plus overdubs: 1994 Nashville Tennessee - Michael Blaustone: drums; Steve Bryant: guitar; James A. Wilson: bass; Troy Lancaster: guitar; Scotty Turner: guitar; Woody Wright: guitar
30: I Know I'll Have The Blues Again (Holly-Mackey) - Whitesidewalls
c. 1980: Cookhouse Recording Studios - 2541 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Pat Brown: guitar, drums, vocal; Karl Ausland: guitar, vocal; Dan Melford: bass, vocal; Jeff Schmahl, guitar, keyboards, vocal; Dave Swanson: sax, vocal; Dale Menten: piano
31: Monetta (Holly-Curtis) - Sonny Curtis
September, 1990: BBC Radio Merseyside, Liverpool, England
Sonny Curtis: guitar, vocal
32: A Whole Lot Of Lovin' (Huddle-Petty-Robinson) - Jim Robinson
33: Moondreams (Petty) - The Norman Petty Trio
34: Moondreams (Petty) - The Norman Petty Trio
35: Oh, You Beautiful Doll (Brown-Ayer) - Ivan
36: When Sin Stops (Venable) (take 2) - Waylon Jennings
True stereo versions - For The First Time Anywhere!! Created by Purple Chick

Volume Nine
1: The Paul Cohen Phone Call
28 February, 1957: Jerry Allison's Home, 2215 6th Street, Lubbock, Texas
2: Bill Randle WERE promo
3: Bill Randle WERE promo
30 June, 1957: Norman Petty Studios - 1313 West 7th Street, Clovis, New Mexico
4: Don Passerby promo
5: Don Passerby promo
6: Don Passerby promo
7: Don Passerby promo
15 September, 1957: recorded at The Forum, Montreal, Canada for 1230 Cornwall Radio
8: Red Robinson promo
9: Red Robinson interview
23 October, 1957: recorded Georgia Auditorium, Vancouver, Canada for the for the "Teen Canteen" show
10: Freeman Hover interview
11: Freeman Hover promo
2 November, 1957: recorded at the Albany Hotel, Denver, Colorado for KCSR radio, Chadron, Nebraska
12: Dale Lowery interview
5 November, 1957: recorded at Municipal Auditorium, Topeka, Kansas for KTOP radio
13: Pat Barton interview
31 January, 1958: recorded Newcastle Stadium, Newcastle, Australia for Radio 2KO, Newcastle, AUS
14: Bob Chesney interview
15: Bob Chesney/WTRL promo
24 February, 1958: "Big Gold Record Stars Show", Dade County Auditorium, Miami, Florlda
16: KSYD Wichita Falls promo
17: Dick Arlen WACK promo
unknown dates: unknown locations
18: Alan Freed interview
23 September, 1958 (broadcast 2 October, 1958) WNEW TV Studio, New York City, New York
19: Ronnie King interview
17 October, 1958: recorded at the Catholic Youth Center, Scranton, Pennsylvania for "Teen Time", WGH, 739 Boush, Norfolk, Virginia
20: Dick Clark interview
28 October, 1958: American Bandstand, WFIL Studios 46th & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
21: Big Bopper Winter Dance Party promo
22: Ritchie Valens Winter Dance Party promo
23: Buddy Holly Winter Dance Party promo
1958/1959: unknown locations
24: Newscast about the plane crash
25: WNOE Newscast about the plane crash
26: Newscast about the plane crash
27: A Message To The Dutch Buddy Holly Fan Club From Ella And Lawrence Holley
28: Norman Petty Defends Himself
unknown dates: unknown locations
29: Raining In My Heart (alternate stereo mix from 1959)
30: True Love Ways (alternate stereo mix from 1967)
31: It Doesn't Matter Anymore (alternate stereo mix from 1967)
32: What To Do (alternate stereo mix from 1967)
33: Learning The Game (alternate stereo mix from 1967)
34: Not Fade Away ('complete' alternate take with no backing vocals - outfake by Purple Chick)
35: Peggy Sue Got Married (Jack Hansen's overdubs in stereo for the first time - by Purple Chick)
36: Crying Waiting Hoping (Jack Hansen's overdubs in stereo for the first time - by Purple Chick)
Various odds and ends that there wasn't room for on the other discs.
37: Wait Til The Sun Shines Nellie (Sterling-Von Tilzer) - Bing Crosby
38: Slippin' and Slidin (Penniman-Bocage-Collins-Smith) - Little Richard
39: Dearest (McDaniel-Polk-Baker) - Mickey and Sylvia
40: Love Is Strange (Smith-Baker) - Mickey and Sylvia
41: Smokey Joe's Cafe (Leiber-Stoller) - The Robins
42: Leave My Woman Alone (Charles) - Ray Charles
(supposedly Buddy's Guitar from the Aparment Demos is based upon this)

Continued from Disc 10 - "Buddy's Record Collection"

Volume Ten
1: My Two Timin' Woman (Snow) - Hank Snow
2:1'11 Just Pretend (Martin) - Flatt and Scruggs and the Stanley Brothers
3: Take These Shackles From My Heart (King-Stewarl) - Pee Wee King
4: Footprints In The Snow (Jones) - Bill Monroe and his Bluegrass Boys
5: Baby, Let's Play House ((,Gunter) - Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill
6: Blue Days, Black Nights (Hall) - Ben Hall, Weldon Myrick, Dena Hall
7: I Forgot To Remember To Forget (Kesler-Feathers) - Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill
(the sole acetate of Buddy's version was scratched at Buddy's request to prevent its airplay competing with his first Decca single )
8: Ting A Ling (Nugetre) - The Clovers
9: Gone (Rogers) - Ferlin Husky
10: Have You Ever Been Lonely (De Rose-Brown) - Ernest Tubb
11: Brown-Eyed Handsome Man (Berry) - Chuck Berry
12: Good Rockin' Tonight (Brown) - Elvis Presley
13: Rip It Up (Marascalco-Blackwell) - Little Richard
14: Blue Monday (Bartholomew-Domino) - Fats Domino
15: Honky Tonk (Part 1) (Doggett-Shepard-Butler-Scott) - Bill Doggett
16: Blue Suede Shoes (Perkins) - Elvis Presley
17: Shake Rattle and Roll (Calhoun) - Elvis Presley
18: Bo Diddley (McDaniel) - Bo Diddley
19: Ain't Got No Home (Henry) - Clarence "Frogman" Henry
20: Ready Teddy (Blackwell-Marascalco) - Little Richard
21: Valley Of Tears (Domino-Bartholomew) - Fats Domino
22: All Of My Love (Oh Boy) (West-Tilghman) - Sonny West
23: Send Me Some Lovin' (Marascalco-Price) - Little Richard
24: It's Too Late (Willis) - Chuck Willis
25: An Empty Cup (Petty-Orbison) - Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings
26: (You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care (Leiber-Stoller) - Elvis Presley
27: Mona (McDaniel) - Bo Diddley
28: Rave On (West-Tilghman-Petty) - Sonny West
29: That's My Desire (Kresa-l.oveday) - Frankie Laine
30: Drown In My Own Tears ((Charles) - Ray Charles
31: Hallelujah! I Love Her So (Glover) - Ray Charles
32: Early In The Morning (Darin-Harris) - Bobby Darin
33: Now We're One (Darin) - Bobby Darin
The original versions of some of the songs Buddy covered elsewhere in this set. Some very familiar, others hardly ever heard.
The records Buddy took on tour (see tray picture) will make a great CD some day.
Jesus Never Fails Me /1'll Be Alright - Angelic Gospel Singers
Padre / All at Once - Toni Arden
With You / My Screamin' Screamin' Mimi! - Ray Campi with Johnny Maddox, Henry Hill, and the Debs
Look Forward / Bad Girl - Valerie Carr with Hugo Peretti and His Orchestra
Should I Ever Love Again? / Till the Well Runs Dry - Wynona Ca
Stay as You Are / That's My Desire - The Channels
Mary Ann / Drown in My Tears - Ray Charles
What Would I Do Without You / Hallelujah I Love Her So - Ray Charles
Swanee River Rock / I Want a Littie Girl - Ray Charles
You Be My Baby / My Bonnie - Ray Charles
I Want to Know / Ain't That Love - Ray Charles
Come Back / I've Got a Woman - Ray Charles
Bend a Little My Way / Non Dimenticar - Nat King Cole
Everybody Loves a Lover / Instant Love - Doris Day with Frank De Vol and his Orchestra
A Very Precious Love / Teacher's Pet - Doris Day with Frank De Vol and his Orchestra

Heart Full of Love / The Sound of Music - Doris Day with Frank De Vol and his Orchestra
(My Baby Don't Love Me) No More / Theresa (The Little Flower) - De John Sisters
Hey! Bo Diddley / Mona - Bo Diddley
Before You Accuse Me (Take a Look at Yourself)/Say (Boss Man) - Bo Diddley
Bird Dog / Devoted to You - The Everly Brothers
Problems / Love of My Life - The Everly Brothers
Nothin' Shakin' / Don't Ya Know - Eddie Fontaine
All Night Long / You Got Me Whistling - Johnny Fuller and Band
Honolulu Lu / La Plume de Ma Tante - Hugo and Luigi
Have You Any Rivers / For My Good Fortune - Mahalia Jackson
I Traded Her Love /1'11 Be with You - Roland Johnson
No One Home / Mary Smith - The Jones Boys
Come Live with Me / Be True to Me - Kitty Kallen
Party Doll / I'm Stickin' with You - Buddy Knox with the Orchids /Jim Bowen with the Orchids
You Don't Know / Fever - Peggy Lee
Good Golly, Miss Molly / Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! - Little Richard
Thunder Bird / My Babe - Little Walter and His Jukes
I Got to Go / Roller Coaster - Little Walter and His Jukes
I Can't Stand It Any Longer / Number One in Your Heart - Skeets McDonald
Banana Split / Sugartime - The McGuire Sislers
Love Song from 'Houseboat' (Almost in Your Arms) / Almost in Your Arms (Love Song from 'Houseboat') - Mantovani
Work with Me Annie / Until I Die - The Midnighters
Don't Say Your Last Goodbye / Sexy Ways - The Midnighters
Annie Had a Baby / She's the One - The Midnighters
Honey, Don't Let Me Go / You've Got Me Dizzy - Jimmy Reed
You Got Me Crying / Go on to School - Jimmy Reed
Now That It's Over / I Feel Good - Shirley and Lee
You Gambled / No Time - The Slades
La Bamba / Donna - Ritchie Valells
Dizzy, Miss Lizzy / Slow Down - Larry Williams
Thunder and Lightning / My Life - Chuck Willis
Take Care / Autumn Leaves - Roger Williams
Cast Iron Arm / You've Got Love - Peanuts Wilson

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lunes, 4 de marzo de 2013

JOHNNY CASH - I SEE THE DARKNESS -